Learning Access Tour

How to Build a Low-Carbon Home and Building BSL Tour

Join guide Edward Richards for a British Sign Language tour of the display 'How to Build a Low-Carbon Home' and the museum building, for d/Deaf visitors using BSL and their companions.

How to Build a Low-Carbon Home display photographed by Felix Speller

What to expect

Edward Richards will lead a group tour of Future Observatory's display How to Build a Low-Carbon Home.

In this exhibition, discover how architects are reimagining the use of wood, stone and straw to design homes fit for a greener future. The display follows the journey of these ancient materials from fields, forests and quarries to cutting-edge buildings through models, samples, tools, films and photographs. Richards will then lead the group on a tour exploring the architecture of the museum.

Facilitators

Edward Richards

Richards studied Graphic Design at Camberwell College of Arts and since 2002 has enjoyed delivering British Sign Language tours in museums and galleries to the Deaf community. In addition, he has given socio-documentary photography talks on artists including Robert Frank and Elton John’s ‘The Radical Eye’ exhibition at Tate Modern.

Book online

Booking information

Pre-booking required.

Due to limited capacity, this tour is only for d/Deaf visitors using BSL and their companions.

Please ensure you only book if you plan to attend and please cancel your booking in advance if your availability changes.

Suitable Age: 16 +
Children under 16 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Pay-What-You-Can supports visitors who might find the standard ticket price a barrier.

Tickets are non-refundable and non-exchangeable. Visit our Terms & Conditions page for further information.

The exhibition

How to Build a Low-Carbon Home

How can we design our homes to respond to the climate emergency? Discover how architects are reimagining wood, stone and straw to design homes fit for the future.

Background image: How to Build a Low-Carbon Home exhibition photographed by Felix Speller.